Take a Peek Inside 3 Restored Beverly Hills Hotel Bungalows

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BHH front signage

The Beverly Hills Hotel has been an iconic landmark for over 100 years, and now, the storied Pink Palace is getting an upgrade in a big way—its beloved bungalows are undergoing a comprehensive renovation.

Internationally renowned company Champalimaud Design has been selected to oversee the project, which draws inspiration from the hotel’s legacy and lush surrounding landscape.

Designed exclusively to enhance the feeling of effortless and modern Californian style while maintaining the property’s existing residential feel, newly restored bungalows 5, 18 and 22 include color palettes inspired by warm Southern California tones, such as rust, pinks, greens and golds. Furniture styles include a mix of tailored 40’s French and Hollywood Regency. Key finishes include decorative wallpapers, custom embroidered panels, hand-stenciled patterns, intricate floor inlays, and silk accent pillows. State-of-the-art technological upgrades, such as light and temperature control panels and Bang Olufsen TVs, are also planned.

In addition, five distinct legendary bungalows featuring design elements inspired by select notable guests who have frequented the hotel over the past century will also be unveiled throughout various stages of the project. First introduced in 1915 to accommodate families that wanted more space and privacy, these iconic bungalows have some serious Hollywood history.  For example, you can stay in the bungalow where Gloria Swanson temporarily lived while getting a divorce; or where Elizabeth Taylor spent six of her eight honeymoons; or in the bungalows that Lauren Bacall and Marlene Dietrich called home for over a year. Marilyn Monroe spent weeks at a time in her favorite Bungalow 7, and filmed Lets Make Love in bungalows 20 and 21. Howard Hughes lived on-and-off in Bungalow 4 for 30 years, and registered several others under his name so no one would know which one he was occupying. He also requested that one of his meals of choice, roast beef sandwiches, be left under a tree outside his bungalow almost every night.

Patio TK
Patio of Bungalow 5

BUNGALOW 5

Having spent six of her eight honeymoons here, Bungalow 5’s thoughtful new design incorporates aspects of Elizabeth Taylor’s life and includes whimsical elements reflective of her English roots and most celebrated movie roles. From European furniture and a floral mosaic with English sensibilities, to a horse-head lamp base Egyptian-patterned cabinet, the romantic look and feel of this space is as residential as it is glamorous. Just as it was in her own home, the color blue is present throughout, and gold foil, sparkles, and jewel-colored Arnold Scassi-esque draperies also convey Hollywood’s regency style.mThe one-bedroom bungalow includes a full kitchen, living room with dining area, fireplace and half bath; master suite, full master bath and powder room; a large patio with outdoor seating area, private outdoor pool and Jacuzzi; and three adjoining bedroom options. State-of-the-art technological upgrades, such as light and temperature control panels and premier Bang Olufsen TVs. First introduced in 1915 to accommodate families that wanted more space and privacy, the iconic bungalows remain an important part of the hotel’s character. They are known the world over for their history with Hollywood royalty and colorful anecdotes. Included among them is Elizabeth Taylor’s long- standing association with the hotel, which dates back to her childhood when she would visit her father Francis’ art gallery located on what is now the Promenade level. Ms. Taylor also spent six of her eight honeymoons in the bungalows, with Bungalow 5 being her accommodation of choice where she often stayed with Richard Burton. After her death, Bungalow 5 was the location her family chose for a private memorial service. $8,000 per night.

Living Room
Bungalow 8 Living Room

BUNGALOW 8

Designed exclusively to enhance the feeling of effortless and modern Californian style while maintaining the property’s existing residential feel, the bungalow redesign draws inspiration from the hotel’s legacy and lush surrounding landscape. Color palettes reflect warm Southern California tones, such as rust, pinks, greens and golds, while furniture styles include a mix of tailored 40’s French and Hollywood Regency, enhancing the bungalows welcoming layout and design. Key finishes include decorative wallpapers, custom embroidered panels, hand-stenciled patterns, intricate floor inlays, and silk accent pillows. 18 of the 23 newly restored bungalows will reflect this look and feel, with the five remaining one-of-a-kind bungalows inspired by some of the hotel’s legendary guests. The Grand Premier Bungalow Suite features a spacious living room with fireplace, separate bedroom with king bed, dining for six or eight, full kitchen, marble bathroom with separate shower and soaking tub and private patio overlooking the gardens. State-of-the-art technological upgrades, such as light and temperature control panels and premier Bang Olufsen TVs. First introduced in 1915 to accommodate families that wanted more space and privacy, the iconic bungalows remain an important part of the hotel’s character. They are known the world over for their history with Hollywood royalty and colorful anecdotes, which include Gloria Swanson temporarily residing in one after getting divorced, Elizabeth Taylor spending six of her eight honeymoons there, and Lauren Bacall and Marlene Dietrich each calling them home for over a year. Marilyn Monroe spent weeks at a time in her favorite Bungalow 7, and filmed Lets Make Love in Bungalows 20 and 21. Howard Hughes lived on-and-off in Bungalow 4 for 30 years, and registered several others under his name so no one would know which one he was occupying. He also requested that one of his meals of choice, roast beef sandwiches, be left under a tree outside his bungalow almost every night. $6000 per night.

Dining Room
Bungalow 22 Dining Room

BUNGALOW 22

The masculine and mid-to-late 70s design of this specialty bungalow is reflective of the Palm Springs home of frequent hotel guest Frank Sinatra. Its modern and contemporary décor features leather-wrapped columns, a stone and leather fireplace mantle, extensive use of wood varieties that include Douglas Fir ceilings and walnut furniture, desert colors, and earthy neutral tones. The centerpiece of the bungalow is the expansive and open parlor, featuring lounge-style seating in a social ambiance, and a Yamaha piano.The one-bedroom bungalow includes a living room with dining area, fireplace and half bath; master suite with fireplace, full master bath and dressing room; two private terraces; and an adjoining bedroom option. State-of-the art technological upgrades, such as light and temperature control panels and premier Bang Olufsen TVs. First introduced in 1915 to accommodate families that wanted more space and privacy, the iconic bungalows remain an important part of the hotel’s character. They are known the world over for their history with Hollywood royalty and colorful anecdotes, including Gloria Swanson temporarily residing in one after getting divorced, and Lauren Bacall and Marlene Dietrich each calling them home for over a year. Frequent hotel guest Frank Sinatra also enjoyed many prodigious drinking bouts in the Polo Lounge with members of his beloved Rat Pack, and with its own wet-bar and Grand Piano, the Paul Williams Suite in the hotel’s main house was a personal favorite of his. $5500 per night.

Bungalow 22 Bathroom
Bungalow 22 Bathroom
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