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Selected Works from François Pinault Collection Shown at SongEun ArtSpace

Selected works from François Pinault’s collection of artwork by world-renowned artists are being shown at the SongEun ArtSpace exhibition.

Chief of the French multinational holding company PPR, François Pinault is also an avid art collector. Twenty-three selected works from his impressive contemporary collection are being displayed at the “Agony and Ecstasy” exhibition during the SongEun ArtSpace in Asia. This is the first time works from Pinault’s collection will be presented in an exhibition in the region.

Pinault has decided to entrust the curatorship for this exhibition to Francesca Amfitheatrof. It will focus upon the central theme of portraiture and the representation of the self. The expressive list of works will include portraits, statues, busts, mirrors, animals persevered in formaldehyde and photographs by four major contemporary artists: Damien Hirst, Jeff Koons, Takashi Murakami and Cindy Sherman.

“Agony and Ecstasy” refers to “Damien Hirst’s butterfly diptych and Irving Stone’s biographical novel of Michelangelo Buonarroti derived from the Renaissance painter’s correspondence. The exhibition was inspired by the great master’s depiction of Man and proposes to revisit the “infinite possibilities of how we perceive each other and ourselves.”

As an avid art lover Pinault has developed one of the greatest contemporary art collection in the world, both in terms of quality and diversity. His collection comprises more than 2,000 pieces and was started 40 years ago. The collection has developed a remarkable reputation in part due to its two pillars Palazzo Grassi and Punta della Dogana in Venice. Pinault’s collection is intended to make contemporary art accessible to as wide an audience as possible. To this day, more than 1.5 million visitors have seen works from the collection in Venice and internationally.

Source and Photo: Art Daily

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New York February / March 2014
New York February / March 2014