Haute 100: Mark Zuckerberg Just Introduced a New Facebook Tool

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Mark Zuckerberg may have a net worth of $49.7 billion, but he has not let his wealth affect his distinction between right, wrong and ethical. He continues to transform his social media network platform to be better, featuring a host of tools to better Facebook users’ lives. The introduction of support tools for those who are suffering from depression prove Zuckerberg will continue to discover new tools and ways to make communication that much better.

On Tuesday, June 14th, Facebook announced its new support tools to help users with suicidal behaviors in India, in collaboration with mental health organizations Aasra and Padukone’s Live Love Laugh Foundation. The tool is now available in India to more than 148 Indian users. It will enable users to reach out to troubled friends directly or report their concerning posts to Facebook.

In a statement, Ankhi Das, Public Policy Director, Facebook, India, South and Central Asia said, “Often, friends and family who are the observers in these types of situations don’t know what to do. They’re concerned, but they’re worried about saying the wrong thing or somehow making it worse.” Das added, “Socially, mental illness and thoughts about suicide are just not something we talk about. Facebook is a place where people connect and share and one of the things we have learnt from the mental health partners and academics we have worked with on this issue, is that being connected is a protective factor in suicide prevention.”

So how does it work?

If you see a friend or family member post a concerning status, you can report the post to Facebook and help your family or friend connect to mental health professionals or reach out to them directly. The flagged posts are monitored and reviewed by teams working round-the-clock and across the world, with the most serious reports on self-injury being prioritized. The social network then sends a message to the trouble individual, offering options to talk to a friend about their problem, contact a suicide helpline and get self-help suggestions and self-help resources. See the message below.

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Facebook also send ideas to get in a positive mood. See below.

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Facebook first revealed the suicide help tool last year in 2015 in the U.S. markets.

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