Haute 100: Dwyane Wade Stops by Harvard Business School for a Fireside Chat

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Dwyane Wade

Over the weekend, Haute 100 lister Dwayne Wade spoke to students at the Harvard Business School. Alongside professor Anita Elberse, the Lincoln Filene Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School, Wade stopped by the campus for a fireside chat.

The 34-year-old, who is a past participant in Harvard Business School Executive Education’s The Business of Entertainment, Media, and Sports program, spoke about his WADE Brand. According to the Boston Globe, Wade said to students, “I was very nervous when I came here. You think shooting free throws, down one [point] with two seconds left, is nerve-racking. Come to Harvard for the first time.” He continued, “We all are driven by something in our lives. I was driven by my upbringing. With my mom being on drugs most of my childhood and my dad being addicted to alcohol. . . . It was either [be] in a game or in a gang. I had the determination that I was gonna be something. I was gonna be an NBA player and I put everything into it.”

In addition to Wade, the Harvard students enjoyed a lecture from hip-hop artist Jo-Vaughn Virginie Scott, better known as Joey Bada$$. Both Wade and Scott were invited to the campus by Elberse, who teaches a course covering the businesses of entertainment, media, and sports.

Most recently, Wade teamed up with luxury consignment e-commerce site The RealReal to launch an exclusive sale. Items from the sale includes pieces by Tom Ford, Gucci, Etro, Prada, and Dolce & Gabbana. Proceeds from the sale will go to Wade’s charity, the Wade’s World Foundation, which promotes health, education and social skills for children in at-risk situations. WWF was created as a way for the NBA player to give back to underserved communities and support issues of purpose. “I can’t just let basketball define who I am and what I am supposed to become,” Wade said. “Like my mother always tells me, ‘[My life] is bigger than basketball.’”

#HBS

A photo posted by dwyanewade (@dwyanewade) on

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