Haute 100: Steven A. Cohen Opens Clinics for Veterans, Pledges $275M

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Thanks to Haute 100 lister Steven A. Cohen military veterans and their families will be able to seek counseling and related services for free. The hedge fund manager and founder of Point72 Asset Management and S.A.C. Capital Advisors, has pledged $275 million to open 25 clinics across America dedicated to mental health and other services.

On Wednesday, June 8th, The Steven A. Cohen Military Family Clinic at Metrocare in Addison, Texas opened. According to documents, the clinic will “provide personalized, confidential and evidence-based mental health care to veterans and their families at no cost.” Services will be available to any individual who has served in the U.S. Armed Forces, including the National Guard and Reserves, regardless of role or discharge status, and their family members.

Thus far, the Cohen Veterans Network has opened two Steven A. Cohen Military Family Clinics in Texas — one in San Antonio and the other near Dallas as well as the Steven A. Cohen Military Family Clinic at NYU Langone. Later this year, two more, in Los Angeles and Philadelphia, are scheduled to open.

In a statement made earlier this spring, “The wounds of war are serious. It is not easy to serve your country in combat overseas and then come back into society seamlessly, especially if you are suffering,” Mr. Cohen said. “These men and women have paid an incredible price and it’s important that this country pays back that debt.”

Cohen Veterans Network plans to open five additional clinics in the spring of 2017.

The Cohen Veterans Network was created due to the large amount of veterans who suffer from post-traumatic stress (PTS) and other mental health conditions. Of the more than 2.6 million Americans who has served in the armed forces, roughly 20 percent experience some form of PTS and traumatic brain injury (TBI) and 40 percent of returning veterans who suffer from mental health issues do not seek treatment.

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