Haute 100: There Is a Martin Scorsese Exhibit You Must Attend This Summer

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Calling all Martin Scorsese fans, it’s time to plan a summer trip down under to Melbourne, Australia. Debuting Thursday, May 26th, the Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI) is showcasing a Scorsese Exhibition.

The exhibition is slated to feature never before seen items behind the creative genius that makes Scorsese the talented director, producer, screenwriter, actor, and film historian he is today. Curated by Die Deutsche Kinemathek – Museum für Film und Fernsehen, Berlin, museum-goers will be able to see more than 600 items including scripts, props, notes and customs. Many of the items are from the private collection of Robert De Niro and Scorsese, both Haute 100 listers.

Exclusive to the museum are five uber-exclusive and un-seen costumes from films like The Aviator, Hugo, and Gangs of New York, all designed by Sandy Powell.

Scorsese has had a very successfully career, spanning from the 1960s. However, the New York native’s breakthrough film was the Mean Streets, which was relased in 1973 and starred De Niro. The 73-year-old film producer has been nominated for 12 Academy Awards and won once as well as nominated for 11 Primetime Emmy awards and won three times.

The exhibition will run through Sunday, Sept. 18th. Ticket prices is as follows: full $25, concession $18 and ACMI members $17. The museum hours are Saturday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and on Friday 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. For more information, click here.

Currently, Scorsese is the executive producer of HBO’s new music-related show Vinyl, which stars Bobby Cannavale, Olivia Wilde, Mick Jagger’s son James Jagger, among others. He is also working with Leonard DiCaprio once again in the forthcoming film The Devil in the White City, based off the book The Devil In The White City: Murder, Magic And Madness at the Fair That Changed America written by Erik Larson.

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