The Most Gorgeous Lobby In NYC Is Open Again

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By Will Femia for Curbed
By Will Femia for Curbed

Let us take you back to France just before World War I. Amongst the many cultural traditions we love the French for to this day, was one specific style that is about to make a comeback. Does Art Deco ring a bell? The visual design style that was first founded in France became internationally appreciated and used in the 1920’s through the 40s. It’s popularity soon faded after World War II.

Fast-forward to 2015 when New York City is poised to reopen one of the most notable Art Deco lobbies for the first time since the 1970s. The stunning structure found at 70 Pine Street first opened its doors in 1932. At this time the lobby was laden with Art Deco aesthetics, designs derived from Native-American styles, and lined with multicolored marble. However according to Curbed, around 40 years later AIG took over the building and closed off the picturesque lobby.

It had remained unseen ever since, until the Landmarks Preservation Commission landmarked both the interior and exterior of the building in 2011. Thus ensuring the Art Deco style would be rather permanently preserved.

The Real Deal noted that Designers Clinton & Russell and Holton & George enriched “the lower floors with stylized reliefs that rival any architectural ornamentation created during the Art Deco period in New York City,” the LPC’s wrote in their landmark designation.

Many years and unit renovations later, the lobby will reopen. The building has now been converted into a 600-unit rental by Rose Associates and DTH Capital. Now lucky tenants of 70 Pine Street will forever be able to revel in a testament to the unique style founded in France circa 1920.

By Will Femia for Curbed
By Will Femia for Curbed
By Will Femia for Curbed
By Will Femia for Curbed
By Will Femia for Curbed
By Will Femia for Curbed
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