The Bellagio Gallery of Fine Art Debuts “Painting Women”

Previous PostAdventuredome Debuts El Loco Roller Coaster on Tuesday
Next PostXS Nightclub Debuts $5,000 Cocktail for Anniversary
Marie Louise Elisabeth Vigée-Le Brun, Portrait of a Young Woman, Robert Dawson Evans Collection, Photography©2013 Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
Marie Louise Elisabeth Vigée-Le Brun, Portrait of a Young Woman, Robert Dawson Evans Collection, Photography©2013 Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

The Bellagio Gallery of Fine Art debuted its newest exhibition “Painting Women: Works from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.” Culture-seekers and art-lovers can view the exhibit through Oct. 26, 2014.

Organized in partnership with the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (MFA), the exhibition showcases 34 paintings spanning the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries, revealing the story of women artists, their activism and artistic achievements. The works represent the increased opportunities for education, domestic independence and artistic training that allowed many women to pursue their dreams of becoming professional painters, dating back to the late 18th century.

“We are thrilled to showcase ‘Painting Women’ at BGFA as it tells a powerful and emotional story detailing how women artists developed and contributed in an era when they were yet to be fully recognized,” said BGFA Executive Director Tarissa Tiberti. “The works feature artists of every style while representing a time period when talent was under-appreciated because it was assigned to gender, as the wheels of equality were slowly, but purposefully, grinding.”

The exhibition features a series of paintings portraying female artists as confident practitioners of their craft, as well as a survey of work by iconic women artists including Mary Cassatt, Georgia O’Keeffe and Berthe Morisot. A portrait by French painter Louise Élisabeth Vigée Le Brun, recognized as the most important female painter of the 18th century and role model to the artists showcased, introduces the series. The works are arranged thematically including the 1870s, the era when fine arts training programs first became available to women, to the mid-20th century when women (like their male counterparts) adopted more abstract, modern styles. The exhibit also includes examples of successful artistic partnerships between men and women, such as the work of Philip and Lilian Hale.

Like Haute Living Las Vegas? Join our Facebook page or follow us on Twitter. Want Haute Living Las Vegas delivered to your in box once a week? Sign up for our newsletter.

 

connect with haute living National
Loader