Where Nature and Metal Meet with Allison Armour

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Allison Armour’s expertise in crafting stainless steel fountains, water sculptures, pergolas, boats and obelisks is evidenced by her large-scale works commissioned by the likes of BMW Headquarters in Europe, Sofitel Hotel Group, Red Carnation Hotels Worldwide Group and more. It’s clear she’s both a tough builder and creative large-scale artist— and she’s not afraid to take a risk.

The Paris-born New Yorker attended Parsons, then studied in London at the Architectural Association where she discovered her love of outdoor sculptures and gardens. After crafting a water feature for her personal garden, Armour was hooked for good, continuing to pursue her passions.


“I love almost all 20th century abstract art. It was such an innovative and bold time— full of energy.”

Wondering what the famed artist is up to? Armour divides her time between the US and Europe, and she’s immersed herself in a brand new project with Four Seasons Resort Orlando due to open in early 2014. The job will feature a 4-foot sphere that gently overflows into a 9-foot dish above a clear reflecting pool below, a true outdoor statement piece. The artist is also building a mirrorpolished sculpture for Panama City (her second work in Panama) and is pitching a project for a large-scale piece in Greenwich Park, UK. The work will be a mirror-polished wormhole buried into the ground covered with glass and will be viewed from ground level looking down, similar to The Louvre. Her next project is reinventing the Greek temple in a sacred space installation; this project will be made out of clear acrylic and sit in a black reflecting pool which will have gas jets of fire hidden within.


“I was fortunate enough to visit Nelson Rockefeller’s country estate by Allie Early Where Nature and Metal Meet in upstate New York as a child, and I was mesmerized by the modern abstract sculptures that you could view as you drove up his immensely long driveway,” she tells Haute Living. “He had Henry Moore’s and Calder’s that I especially fell in love with. I love almost all 20th century abstract art. It was such an innovative and bold time— full of energy.”

Armour draws viewers to the future with her designs, while also nodding to the past. “I love the Renaissance period and that idea of beauty as well,” she explains. “I would have to say that my main source of inspiration is nature.”

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