Alfred Jensen/Sol LeWitt and Opening At The Pace Gallery In January

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Two exciting new exhibits will be opening at The Pace Gallery in New York City come January.

Alfred Jensen/Sol LeWitt: Systems and Transformation

January 13 – February 11, 2012

32 East 57th Street, New York

This exhibition juxtaposes the work of Alfred Jensen and Sol LeWitt, two artists whose bodies of work connect to the grid and are governed by systems.  Exhibited side-by-side, Jensen’s colorful and tactile diagrammatic paintings and LeWitt’s minimalist white structures reveal the vastly different outcomes that can arise from similar conceptual foundations.  Jensen uses mathematical systems to construct two-dimensional grid paintings and demonstrate color theories, but the work itself is metaphorical, referencing pre-Colombian and Asian cultures, textiles, and divination.  LeWitt’s three-dimensional grid sculptures, in contrast, are self-referential, rooted in reality, and governed by mathematical instructions that objectively organize space.

Jean Dubuffet: The Last Two Years

510 West 25th Street, New York

January 20 – March 10, 2012

An exhibition featuring nearly twenty works from the final two bodies of work by Jean Dubuffet.  After twelve years of working on his Hourloupe cycle with a palette of primarily red, blue and black, in 1983 Dubuffet unleashed an extended color palette across the canvas, removing the borders and a representational reference point.  From February 1983 to February 1984, the artist painted the Mires, or “Test Patterns,” exclusively, meant to evoke in viewers a visceral reaction that might rid the mind of the teachings of culture and tradition so as to see with a naked eye. Dubuffet entitled his final series (painted in 1984)Non-Lieux, a legal term meaning neither guilty nor innocent—in effect, “no verdict.”  The exhibition will be accompanied by a catalogue with an essay by curator Harmony Murphy.

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