Lexus LFA Steals the Show in Tokyo

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Last Wednesday, the Tokyo Motor Show saw Mitsubishi introduce its PX-MiEV plug-in hybrid crossover, Nissan’s chief executive, Carlos Ghosn, drive onto the stage in Nissan’s Land Glider, a new slender ultra-efficient vehicle that is a cross between a city car and a kayak, and many, many other haute new ways for car lovers to be environmentally friendly.

With all of that going green excitement, however, is it possible that the Lexus LFA would be sidelined? Not a chance. The limited edition supercar from Japan wasn’t just formally introduced at the show; it indisputably stole the engine revving spotlight. The incredibly sleek and eye-catching car has a price tag of $375,000, making it the most expensive car Toyota has ever produced, but fear not, it will be the most powerful car the car maker has ever produced meaning you will certainly be getting your money’s worth.

The remarkable design of the car is enough to make any heart start racing with its tremendously angular appearance, cutaways, vents, and not to mention the race-bred engineering that went into its construction. The Lexus LFA’s chassis and body is made primarily of Toyota’s own in-house lightweight carbon-fiber reinforced polymer and it has a 4.8-liter V-10 engine that revs to 9,000 r.p.m. with 552 HP and 354 lb-ft of torque. The car has a top speed of 202 miles per hour and Mark Templin, the Lexus division group vice president and general manager, notes, “The development of the LFA was unlike any other Lexus. Minute details were engineered to provide an engaging and serious supercar that delivers impressive performance on and off the racetrack.”

Toyota will start the production of the Lexus LFA in December 2010 and no more than 20 will be made per month. Templin adds, “Only 500 will ever be built worldwide, and each will be assembled to customer order.”

Via: The New York Times

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